OUR EVENTS

Below you’ll find a complete list of events either hosted or supported by the NCRB of the UNA Canada. Please check frequently as new events are always emerging.

June 1, 2020
  • Global Day of Parents 1 June

    June 1, 2020

    Global Day of Parents 1 June

    The Global Day of Parents is observed on the 1st of June every year. The Day was proclaimed by the UN General Assembly in 2012 with resolution A/RES/66/292 and honours parents throughout the world. The Global Day provides an opportunity to appreciate all parents in all parts of the world for their selfless commitment to children and their lifelong sacrifice towards nurturing this relationship.

    Since the 1980s, the important role of the family has increasingly come to the attention of the international community. The General Assembly adopted a number of resolutions, and proclaimed the International Year of the Family and the International Day of Families.

    Emphasizing the critical role of parents in the rearing of children, the Global Day of Parents recognizes also that the family has the primary responsibility for the nurturing and protection of children. For the full and harmonious development of their personality, children should grow up in a family environment and in an atmosphere of happiness, love and understanding.

    The central goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development adopted by the world leaders in 2015, focus on ending poverty, promoting shared economic prosperity, social development and people’s well-being while protecting the environment. Families remain at the centre of social life ensuring the well-being of their members, educating and socializing children and youth and caring for young and old.

    In particular, family-oriented policies can contribute to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals 1 to 5 relating to doing away with poverty and hunger; ensuring healthy lives and promoting of well-being for all ages; ensuring educational opportunities throughout the lifespan and achieving gender equality.

     

June 3, 2020
  • World Bicycle Day June 3

    June 3, 2020

    On June 3, 2018, the first official World Bicycle Day will be celebrated.

    Why celebrate the bicycle?

    The bicycle is a simple, affordable, reliable, clean and environmentally fit sustainable means of transportation; The bicycle can serve as a tool for development and as a means not just of transportation but also of access to education, health care and sport; The synergy between the bicycle and the user fosters creativity and social engagement and gives the user an immediate awareness of the local environment; The bicycle is a symbol of sustainable transportation and conveys a positive message to foster sustainable consumption and production, and has a positive impact on climate. World Bicycle Day:

    Encourages Member States to devote particular attention to the bicycle in cross-cutting development strategies and to include the bicycle in international, regional, national and subnational development policies and programmes; Encourages Member States to improve road safety and integrate it into sustainable mobility and transport infrastructure planning and design, in particular through policies and measures to actively protect and promote pedestrian safety and cycling mobility, with a view to broader health outcomes, particularly the prevention of injuries and non-communicable diseases; Encourages stakeholders to emphasize and advance the use of the bicycle as a means of fostering sustainable development, strengthening education, including physical education, for children and young people, promoting health, preventing disease, promoting tolerance, mutual understanding and respect and facilitating social inclusion and a culture of peace; Encourages Member States to adopt best practices and means to promote the bicycle among all members of society, and in this regard welcomes initiatives to organize bicycle rides at the national and local levels as a means of strengthening physical and mental health and well-being and developing a culture of cycling in society.

     

June 4, 2020
  • Logo of tInternational Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression 4 June

    June 4, 2020

    “Children need peace and protection at all times. The rules of war prohibit the unlawful targeting of civilians, attacks on schools or hospitals, the use, recruitment and unlawful detention of children, and the denial of humanitarian assistance. When conflicts break out, these rules need to be respected and those who break them need to be held to account. Enough is enough. Stop attacks on children."

    —UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta H. Fore

    It is a sad reality that in situations where armed conflict breaks out, it is the most vulnerable members of societies – namely children, who are most affected by the consequences of war. The six most common violations are recruitment and use of children in war, killing, sexual violence, abduction, attacks on schools and hospitals, and denial of humanitarian access.

    On 19 August 1982, at its emergency special session on the question of Palestine, the General Assembly, “appalled at the great number of innocent Palestinian and Lebanese children victims of Israel’s acts of aggression”, decided to commemorate 4 June of each year as the International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression (resolution ES-7/8).

    The purpose of the day is to acknowledge the pain suffered by children throughout the world who are the victims of physical, mental and emotional abuse. This day affirms the UN's commitment to protect the rights of children. Its work is guided by the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most rapidly and widely ratified international human rights treaty in history.

    This video presents the work of the office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict. The mandate of the Special Representative was created in 1996 to address the plight of children affected by war.

     

  • International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression 4 June

    June 4, 2020

    I nternational Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression 4 June

    "Children need peace and protection at all times. The rules of war prohibit the unlawful targeting of civilians, attacks on schools or hospitals, the use, recruitment and unlawful detention of children, and the denial of humanitarian assistance. When conflicts break out, these rules need to be respected and those who break them need to be held to account. Enough is enough. Stop attacks on children."

    —UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta H. Fore It is a sad reality that in situations where armed conflict breaks out, it is the most vulnerable members of societies – namely children, who are most affected by the consequences of war. The six most common violations are recruitment and use of children in war, killing, sexual violence, abduction, attacks on schools and hospitals, and denial of humanitarian access.

    On 19 August 1982, at its emergency special session on the question of Palestine, the General Assembly, “appalled at the great number of innocent Palestinian and Lebanese children victims of Israel’s acts of aggression”, decided to commemorate 4 June of each year as the International Day of Innocent Children Victims of Aggression (resolution ES-7/8).

    The purpose of the day is to acknowledge the pain suffered by children throughout the world who are the victims of physical, mental and emotional abuse. This day affirms the UN's commitment to protect the rights of children. Its work is guided by the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the most rapidly and widely ratified international human rights treaty in history.

    This video presents the work of the office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict. The mandate of the Special Representative was created in 1996 to address the plight of children affected by war.

     

June 5, 2020
  • World Environment Day 5 June

    June 5, 2020

    World Environment Day 5 June

    "On World Environment Day, the message is simple: reject single-use plastic. Refuse what you can’t re-use. Together, we can chart a path to a cleaner, greener world." — Secretary-General, António Guterres Humans are both creatures and moulders of their environment, which gives them physical sustenance and affords them the opportunity for intellectual, moral, social and spiritual growth. In the long and tortuous evolution of the human race on this planet a stage has been reached when, through the rapid acceleration of science and technology, humans have acquired the power to transform their environment in countless ways and on an unprecedented scale.

    The United Nations, aware that the protection and improvement of the human environment is a major issue, which affects the well-being of peoples and economic development throughout the world, designated 5 June as World Environment Day. The celebration of this day provides us with an opportunity to broaden the basis for an enlightened opinion and responsible conduct by individuals, enterprises and communities in preserving and enhancing the environment. Since it began in 1974, it has grown to become a global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated in more than 100 countries.

    “Beat Plastic Pollution”

    Each World Environment Day is organized around a theme that focuses attention on a particularly pressing environmental concern. The theme for 2018, “Beat Plastic Pollution,” is a call to action for all of us to come together to combat one of the great environmental challenges of our time. The theme invites us all to consider how we can make changes in our everyday lives to reduce the heavy burden of plastic pollution on our natural places, our wildlife – and our own health. While plastic has many valuable uses, we have become over-reliant on single-use or disposable plastic – with severe environmental consequences.

    Learn more about this year's theme.

    This World Environment Day UN Environment is asking you, companies and civil society groups, to take a concrete action to Beat Plastic Pollution. Let’s all help to clean up our environment. You can register your #BeatPlasticPollution activity.

    India, the host country

    Every World Environment Day has a different global host country, where the official celebrations take place. This year it is India. Read more about the host country.

    CleanSeas Break-Up PSA: "It's not me, it's you."

     

  • International Day for the Fight against Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing 5 June

    June 5, 2020

    Fisheries provide a vital source of food, employment, recreation, trade and economic well-being for people throughout the world. In a world of growing population and persistent hunger, fish has emerged as an important commodity for the achievement of food security. However, efforts by the international community to ensure the sustainability of fisheries are being seriously compromised by illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing activities.

    According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing activities are responsible for the loss of 11–26 million tonnes of fish each year, which is estimated to have an economic value of US$10–23 billion. To curtail this impact, Target 4 of Goal 14 of the Sustainable Development Agenda adopted in 2015 by the UN General Assembly, specifically urges the international community to “effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices” by 2020.

    Meeting this ambitious target requires strong awareness-raising efforts to draw the attention of the general public to the negative impacts of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing activities, an activity in which FAO has been actively engaged.

    Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing

    To promote long-term conservation and sustainable use of fisheries resources the 1995 FAO Conference adopted the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. The Code is voluntary and sets out principles and international standards of behavior for responsible practices with a view to ensuring the effective conservation, management and development of living aquatic resources, with due respect for the ecosystem and biodiversity.

    In 2009 the FAO Conference adopted the Agreement on Port State Measures to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing. The Agreement is binding and stipulates minimum port State measures to prevent, deter and eliminate illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. It entered into force on 5 June 2016.

     

June 6, 2020
  • Russian Language Day June 6

    June 6, 2020

    Russian Language Day June 6

    День русского языка в ООН

    6 июня, в день рождения великого русского поэта А.С. Пушкина, в рамках программы поддержки и развития многоязычия и культурного многообразия, в ООН отмечается День русского языка. Одна из целей этой программы — поддержание равноправия всех шести официальных языков ООН: английского, арабского, испанского, китайского, русского и французского.

    Решение о проведении дней языков было принято Департаментом общественной информации ООН накануне Международного дня родного языка, отмечаемого ежегодно 21 февраля по инициативе ЮНЕСКО.

    Целью проводимых дней языков ООН является повышение информированности об истории, культуре и развитии каждого из шести официальных языков ООН среди сотрудников Организации. Каждому языку предоставлена возможность найти свой уникальный подход и разработать собственную программу мероприятий дня, включая приглашение известных поэтов и писателей и разработку информационных и тематических материалов.

    Культурные мероприятия, среди прочих, могут включать в себя исполнение музыкальных и литературных произведений, конкурсы, выставки, лекции, эстрадные представления и выступления деятелей культуры, проведение дней национальной кухни и выступление фольклорных коллективов, демонстрацию кинофильмов и экспресс-уроки языка для желающих изучить еще один из официальных языков ООН.

    Определены даты следующих дней:

    20 марта — День французского языка (Международный день франкофонии). 20 апреля — День китайского языка (посвящен Цан Цзе, основателю китайской письменности). 23 апреля — День английского языка (день рождения У. Шекспира). 23 апреля — День испанского языка ("Dia de la Hispanidad" — день испаноязычной культуры). 6 июня — День русского языка (день рождения А.С. Пушкина). 18 декабря — День арабского языка (день утверждения в 1973 году решения о включении арабского языка в число официальных и рабочих языков Генеральной Ассамблеи и ее главных комитетов).

     

June 8, 2020
  • World Oceans Day 8 June

    June 8, 2020

    World Oceans Day 8 June

    Why celebrate World Oceans Day?

    We celebrate World Oceans Day to remind everyone of the major role the oceans have in everyday life. They are the lungs of our planet, providing most of the oxygen we breathe. The purpose of the Day is to inform the public of the impact of human actions on the ocean, develop a worldwide movement of citizens for the ocean, and mobilize and unite the world’s population on a project for the sustainable management of the world's oceans. They are a major source of food and medicines and a critical part of the biosphere. In the end, it is a day to celebrate together the beauty, the wealth and the promise of the ocean.

    Action focus for 2018: preventing plastic pollution and encouraging solutions for a healthy ocean

    Plastic pollution is causing tremendous harm to our marine resources. For example:

    80% of all pollution in the ocean comes from people on land. 8 million tonnes of plastic per year ends up in the ocean, wreaking havoc on wildlife, fisheries and tourism. Plastic pollution costs the lives of 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals per year. Fish eat plastic, and we eat the fish. Plastic causes $8 billion in damage to marine ecosystems each year. Change starts with you

    There are many things we can do as individuals to reduce our plastic consumption.

    Remember: Use less plastic and recycle the plastic you must use.

    Use these hashtags in social media to spread the word to help clean up our ocean: #WorldOceansDay, #SaveOurOcean.

    As in previous years since 2014, the Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea is recognizing on 8 June the winners of the Annual World Oceans Day Oceanic Photo Competition in an event at United Nations Headquarters.

    Oceans and the Sustainable Development Goals

    The Declaration of World Oceans Day in 2008 catalysed action worldwide. Twenty-five years after the first Oceans Day took place in Rio de Janeiro at UNCED, a special event on June 8th marked its celebration during the United Nations Ocean Conference held from 5-9 June 2017. The Ocean Conference was convened to support the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 14 of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.

     

June 12, 2020
  • World Day Against Child Labour 12 June

    June 12, 2020

    World Day Against Child Labour 12 June

    The International Labour Organization (ILO) launched the World Day Against Child Labour in 2002 to focus attention on the global extent of child labour and the action and efforts needed to eliminate it. Each year on 12 June, the World Day brings together governments, employers and workers organizations, civil society, as well as millions of people from around the world to highlight the plight of child labourers and what can be done to help them.

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adopted by world leaders in 2015, include a renewed global commitment to ending child labour. Specifically, target 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goals calls on the global community to: "Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms."

    Generation Safe & Healthy

    This year, the World Day Against Child Labour and the World Day for Safety and Health at Work shine a spotlight on the global need to improve the safety and health of young workers and end child labour.

    This joint campaign aims to accelerate action to achieve Sustainable Development Goal target 8.8 of safe and secure working environments for all workers by 2030 and SDG target 8.7 of ending all forms of child labour by 2025. Achieving these goals for the benefit of the next generation of the global workforce requires a concerted and integrated approach to eliminating child labour and promoting a culture of prevention on occupational safety health.

    The returns on the investment in ending child labour are incalculable. Children who are free from the burden of child labour are able to fully realize their rights to education, leisure, and healthy development, in turn providing the essential foundation for broader social and economic development, poverty eradication, and human rights.

    We must move much faster if we are to honour our commitment on ending child labour, and we need to do it together.

     

  • World Day Against Child Labour 12 June

    June 12, 2020

    The International Labour Organization (ILO) launched the World Day Against Child Labour in 2002 to focus attention on the global extent of child labour and the action and efforts needed to eliminate it. Each year on 12 June, the World Day brings together governments, employers and workers organizations, civil society, as well as millions of people from around the world to highlight the plight of child labourers and what can be done to help them.

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adopted by world leaders in 2015, include a renewed global commitment to ending child labour. Specifically, target 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goals calls on the global community to: "Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms."

    Generation Safe & Healthy

    This year, the World Day Against Child Labour and the World Day for Safety and Health at Work shine a spotlight on the global need to improve the safety and health of young workers and end child labour.

    This joint campaign aims to accelerate action to achieve Sustainable Development Goal target 8.8 of safe and secure working environments for all workers by 2030 and SDG target 8.7 of ending all forms of child labour by 2025. Achieving these goals for the benefit of the next generation of the global workforce requires a concerted and integrated approach to eliminating child labour and promoting a culture of prevention on occupational safety health.

    The returns on the investment in ending child labour are incalculable. Children who are free from the burden of child labour are able to fully realize their rights to education, leisure, and healthy development, in turn providing the essential foundation for broader social and economic development, poverty eradication, and human rights.

    We must move much faster if we are to honour our commitment on ending child labour, and we need to do it together.

     

June 13, 2020
  • International Albinism Awareness Day 13 June

    June 13, 2020

    People with albinism face multiple forms of discrimination worldwide. Albinism is still profoundly misunderstood, socially and medically. The physical appearance of persons with albinism is often the object of erroneous beliefs and myths influenced by superstition, which foster their marginalization and social exclusion. This leads to various forms of stigma and discrimination.

    In some communities, erroneous beliefs and myths, heavily influenced by superstition, put the security and lives of persons with albinism at constant risk. These beliefs and myths are centuries old and are present in cultural attitudes and practices around the world.

    On 18 December 2014, the General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming, with effect from 2015, 13 June as International Albinism Awareness Day.

    The United Nations Human Rights Council adopted a resolution in 2013 calling for the prevention of attacks and discrimination against persons with albinism. Moreover, in response to the call from civil society organizations advocating to consider persons with albinism as a specific group with particular needs that require special attention, on 26 March 2015, the Council created the mandate of Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights by persons with albinism.

    In January 2016, Ms. Ikponwosa Ero, United Nations Independent Expert on the Enjoyment of Human Rights of Persons with Albinism submitted her first report on albinism to the UN Human Rights Council. Adding to the information contained in the July 2016 report to the General Assembly, the latest report was presented to the Human Rights Council in 2017 and included a focus on witchcraft as a key root cause of attacks against persons with albinism.

    Follow the conversation on social media #NotGhosts.

     

June 15, 2020
  • World Elder Abuse Awareness Day 15 June

    June 15, 2020

    Virtually all countries are expected to see substantial growth in the number of older persons between 2015 and 2030, and that growth will be faster in developing regions. Because the numbers of older persons are growing, the amount of elder abuse can be expected to grow with it. While the taboo topic of elder abuse has started to gain visibility across the world, it remains one of the least investigated types of violence in national surveys, and one of the least addressed in national action plans.

    Elder abuse is a global social issue which affects the health and human rights of millions of older persons around the world, and an issue which deserves the attention of the international community.

    The United Nations General Assembly, in its resolution 66/127, designated June 15 as World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. It represents the one day in the year when the whole world voices its opposition to the abuse and suffering inflicted to some of our older generations

    Key facts Around 1 in 6 older people experienced some form of abuse in the past year. Rates of abuse may be higher for older people living in institutions than in the community. Elder abuse can lead to serious physical injuries and long-term psychological consequences. Elder abuse is predicted to increase as many countries are experiencing rapidly ageing populations. The global population of people aged 60 years and older will more than double, from 900 million in 2015 to about 2 billion in 2050.

     

June 16, 2020
  • International Day of Family Remittances 16 June

    June 16, 2020

    The International Day of Family Remittances (IDFR), celebrated every year on 16 June, is aimed at recognizing the significant financial contribution migrant workers make to the wellbeing of their families back home and to the sustainable development of their countries of origin. It is also aimed at encouraging the public and private sectors, as well as the civil society, to do more together and collaborate to maximize the impact of these funds in the developing world.

    The IDFR was unanimously proclaimed by all 176 member states of IFAD's Governing Council at its 38th session in February 2015, and adopted by the UN General Assembly in June 2018 (draft A/72/L.56).

    Proclaiming an International Day of Family Remittances represents an invaluable opportunity not only to recognize the efforts of migrant workers globally, but also to strengthen current partnerships and create new synergies among sectors to promote the development impact of remittances worldwide.

    The first IDFR was celebrated on 16 June 2015 by more than 400 policy-makers, private sector representatives and civil society leaders at the opening of the Fifth Global Forum on Remittances and Development in Milan.

    In 2016 over eighty money transfer operators endorsed the IDFR and committed to take concrete action to ensure that family remittances count for even more. Read their statements.

    In 2017 and 2018 the Day received an unprecedented support from the private sector, with over 100 Money Transfer Operators (MTOs) through IAMTN, 800 mobile companies through GSMA, 6,000 savings banks across 80 countries through WSBI, and several individual private sector entities. The Day was also supported by the 22 UN organizations within the Global Migration Group (GMG), individually by IOM and by several member states.

     

  • World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought 17 June

    June 16, 2020

    Desertification is the degradation of land in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid areas. It is caused primarily by human activities and climatic variations. Desertification does not refer to the expansion of existing deserts. It occurs because dryland ecosystems, which cover over one third of the world‘s land area, are extremely vulnerable to overexploitation and inappropriate land use. Poverty, political instability, deforestation, overgrazing and bad irrigation practices can all undermine the productivity of the land.

    The World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought is observed every year to promote public awareness of international efforts to combat desertification. The day is a unique moment to remind everyone that land degradation neutrality is achievable through problem-solving, strong community involvement and co-operation at all levels.

    2018 Theme “Land has true value – invest in it.”

    Your choices determine future scenarios for sustainable growth. The 2018 World Day to Combat Desertification campaign #2018WDCD urges you to move away from unsustainable land use and make a difference by investing in the future of land under the slogan, “Land has true value — invest in it.” (source)

    Every one of us has a role to play, know the true value of land and invest in it:

    Spending money on organic and fairly trade products to avoid land degradation. Making a pledge to protect and conserve the value of land. Observing World Day to Combat Desertification, supporting a sustainable way of living, producing and consuming. Organizing an event or launching an initiative to promote sustainable land management (SLM) and land degradation neutrality (LDN). Send the details of your event to wdcd2018@unccd.int. Sharing photos and videos on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Weibo accounts, from 11 to 17 June, 2018. Remember to tag @UNCCD and use the hashtag #2018WDCD.

     

June 18, 2020
  • Sustainable Gastronomy Day 18 June

    June 18, 2020

    Sustainable Gastronomy Day emphasizes the need to focus the world’s attention on the role that sustainable gastronomy can play. It also reaffirms that all cultures and civilizations are contributors and crucial enablers of sustainable development.

    The UN General Assembly adopted on 21 December 2016 its resolution A/RES/71/246 and designated 18 June as an international observance, Sustainable Gastronomy Day.

    The decision acknowledges gastronomy as a cultural expression related to the natural and cultural diversity of the world.

    Sustainable gastronomy can play a role due to its interlinkages with the three dimensions of sustainable development, in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals by promoting:

    agricultural development; food security; nutrition; sustainable food production; and conservation of biodiversity. A pathway to nutritious food systems and sustainable development: geographical indications (GIs)

    The promotion of linkages between local producers, their local areas and their food products through geographical indications (GIs) is recognized as a pathway to nutritious food systems and sustainable development for rural communities throughout the world. The quality and specific attributes of food linked to origin, its diversity and local access are all matters that affect sustainable food systems and healthy diets. (Source: FAO)

     

June 19, 2020
  • International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict 19 June

    June 19, 2020

    2018 Theme: “The Plight and Rights of Children Born of War”

    The effects of conflict-related sexual violence echo across generations, through trauma, stigma, poverty, poor health and unwanted pregnancy. The children whose existence emanates from that violence have been labelled “bad blood” or “children of the enemy”, and alienated from their mother’s social group. Children conceived through rape in wartime often struggle with issues of identity and belonging for decades after the end of war. They are rarely accepted by society, and unsafe abortion remains a leading cause of maternal mortality in conflict-affected settings.

    The stigma associated with sexual violence can have life-long, and sometimes lethal, repercussions for both survivors and children conceived through rape. Socioeconomic reintegration support, aimed to alleviate stigma and mend the social fabric, should therefore infuse all post-conflict reconstruction and recovery efforts.

    On this day, we strive to foster solidarity with survivors who endure multiple, intersecting stigmas in the wake of sexual violence, including the stigma of association with an armed or terrorist group, and of bearing children conceived through rape by the enemy. Often, these women and children are viewed as affiliates, rather than victims, of armed and violent extremist groups. These children may be left stateless, in a legal limbo, and susceptible to recruitment, radicalization, trafficking and exploitation, with wider implications for peace and security, as well as human rights. However, the issue of children born of war has been missing from both the international human rights framework and from peace and security discourse, rendering them a voiceless category of victims.

    Event at UN Headquarters

    A panel discussion to commemorate the third annual International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict will be held at United Nations Headquarters in New York on Tuesday, 19 June 2018, 3:30 - 5:30 p.m. in Conference Room 2.

    The event will include reflections on how the lessons of history can be applied to contemporary conflict and post-conflict societies, in which women and children released from armed and violent extremist groups struggle to reintegrate into their families and communities. It will consider strategies such as enlisting religious and traditional leaders to help change harmful social norms and dispel the perception that these children and their mothers were complicit in the crimes committed by their captors. Download the invitation.

    Follow the conversation on social media #EndRapeinWar.

     

June 20, 2020
  • World Refugee Day 20 June

    June 20, 2020

    n a world where violence forces thousands of families to flee for their lives each day, the time is now to show that the global public stands with refugees.

    To do this, the UN Refugee Agency launched the #WithRefugees petition in June 2016 to send a message to governments that they must work together and do their fair share for refugees.

    On World Refugee Day, held every year on June 20th, we commemorate the strength, courage and perseverance of millions of refugees. This year, World Refugee Day also marks a key moment for the public to show support for families forced to flee.

     

June 21, 2020
  • International Day of Yoga 21 June

    June 21, 2020

    Yoga is an ancient physical, mental and spiritual practice that originated in India. The word ‘yoga’ derives from Sanskrit and means to join or to unite, symbolizing the union of body and consciousness.

    Today it is practiced in various forms around the world and continues to grow in popularity.

    Recognizing its universal appeal, on 11 December 2014, the United Nations proclaimed 21 June as the International Day of Yoga by resolution 69/131.

    The International Day of Yoga aims to raise awareness worldwide of the many benefits of practicing yoga.

    Yoga for Peace

    The theme for the 2018 celebration, organized by the Permanent Mission of India to the United Nations, is 'Yoga for Peace.'

     

June 23, 2020
  • International Widows’ Day 23 June

    June 23, 2020

    Invisible Women, Invisible Problems

    Although accurate information is limited, it has been estimated that there are some 258 million widows around the world, and nearly one in ten live in extreme poverty. Data on women’s status are often not disaggregated by marital status, so at every level of gender statistics, from national to global, widows are not visible. Yet we know that many elderly widows face multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination, based on their gender, age, rural location or disability. Others are still young when they lose their husbands, perhaps as a result of conflict or because they were married as children to a much older man. These women face a long lifetime of widowhood.

    Once widowed, women in many countries often confront a denial of inheritance and land rights, degrading and life-threatening mourning and burial rites and other forms of widow abuse.

    Widows are often evicted from their homes and physically abused – some even killed – even by members of their own family. In many countries, a woman’s social status is inextricably linked to her husband’s, so that when her husband dies, a woman no longer has a place in society. To regain social status, widows are expected to marry one of their husband’s male relatives, sometimes unwillingly. For many, the loss of a husband is only the first trauma in a long-term ordeal.

    In many countries, widowhood is stigmatized and seen as a source of shame. Widows are thought to be cursed in some cultures and are even associated with witchcraft. Such misconceptions can lead to widows being ostracized, abused and worse.

    The children of widows are often affected, both emotionally and economically. Widowed mothers, now supporting their families alone, are forced to withdraw children from school and to rely on their labour. Moreover, the daughters of widows may suffer multiple deprivations, increasing their vulnerability to abuse.

    Such cruelties are often seen as justified in terms of cultural or religious practice. Impunity for abuses of the rights of widows is rife, with few perpetrators ever successfully brought to justice. Even in countries where legal protection is more inclusive, widows can suffer social marginalization.

    Towards progress for widows

    International Widows Day is an opportunity for action towards achieving full rights and recognition for widows – too long invisible, uncounted and ignored. A dearth of reliable hard data remains one of the major obstacles to developing the policies and programmes to address the poverty, violence and discriminationsuffered by widows. There is a need for more research and statistics disaggregated by marital status, sex and age, in order to help reveal the incidence of widow abuse and illustrate the situation of widows.

    Furthermore, Governments should take action to uphold their commitments to ensure the rights of widows as enshrined in international law, including the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Even when national laws exist to protect the rights of widows, weaknesses in the judicial systems of many States compromise how widows’ rights are defended in practice and should be addressed. Lack of awareness and discrimination by judicial officials can cause widows to avoid turning to the justice system to seek reparations.

    Programmes and policies for ending violence against widows and their children, poverty alleviation, education and other support to widows of all ages also need to be undertaken, including in the context of action plans to accelerate achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals.

    In post-conflict situations, widows should be brought in to participate fully in peacebuilding and reconciliation processes to ensure that they contribute to sustainable peace and security.

    Empowering widows through access to adequate healthcare, education, decent work, full participation in decision-making and public life, and lives free of violence and abuse, would give them a chance to build a secure life after bereavement. Importantly, creating opportunities for widows can also help to protect their children and avoid the cycle of inter-generational poverty and deprivation.

     

  • United Nations Public Service Day 23 June

    June 23, 2020

    The UN General Assembly, in its resolution 57/277, designated 23 June as Public Service Day.

    The UN Public Service Day celebrates the value and virtue of public service to the community; highlights the contribution of public service in the development process; recognizes the work of public servants, and encourages young people to pursue careers in the public sector.

    Since the first Awards Ceremony in 2003, the United Nations has received an increasing number of submissions from all around the world.

     

June 25, 2020
  • Day of the Seafarer - June 25

    June 25, 2020

    Day of the Seafarer 2018 (IMO) ​

    ​This year, once again, 25 June will mark the annual Day of the Seafarer (DotS). Seafarers wellbeing

    ​2017 and 2018 have seen strong momentum in the industry to address seafarer's wellbeing, particularly their mental health. To give further exposure to this important issue, our choice for the 2018 Day of the Seafarer theme is "seafarers' wellbeing". By addressing the issue of seafarers' wellbeing and particularly mental health, this campaign can inform specific strategies to tackle stress and other issues affecting seafarers' mental conditions - and make the tools available more widely known. The campaign will seek to highlight and showcase best practices and good examples but will also, inevitably, bring out

     

June 26, 2020
  • International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, 26 June

    June 26, 2020

    By resolution 42/112 of 7 December 1987, the General Assembly decided to observe 26 June as the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking as an expression of its determination to strengthen action and cooperation to achieve the goal of an international society free of drug abuse.

    Supported each year by individuals, communities and various organizations all over the world, this global observance aims to raise awareness of the major problem that illicit drugs represent to society.

    Listen First

    Building on the success of last year, the theme for 2018 is: "Listen First - Listening to children and youth is the first step to help them grow healthy and safe." It is an initiative to increase support for prevention of drug use that is based on science and is thus an effective investment in the well-being of children and youth, their families and their communities.

    The UN General Assembly held a Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs in April 2016. This Special Session marked an important milestone in achieving the goals set in the policy document of 2009 "Political Declaration and Plan of Action on International Cooperation towards an Integrated and Balanced Strategy to Counter the World Drug Problem", which defined action to be taken by Member States as well as goals to be achieved by 2019.

    The outcome document recommends measures to address demand and supply reduction, and to improve access to controlled medicines while preventing diversion. The recommendations also cover the areas of human rights, youth, children, women and communities; emerging challenges, including new psychoactive substances; strengthening international cooperation; and alternative development. The text puts new emphasis on proportionate national sentencing policies and practices for drug-related offences, and features a strong focus on prevention and treatment.

     

June 27, 2020
  • Micro-, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Day 27 June

    June 27, 2020

    A great source of employment

    Last year on 27 June we celebrated for the first time the Micro-, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Day. Those enterprises, which generally employ fewer than 250 persons, are the backbone of most economies worldwide and play a key role in developing countries. Those enterprises, which generally employ fewer than 250 persons, are the backbone of most economies worldwide and play a key role in developing countries.

    According to the data provided by the International Council for Small Business (ICSB), formal and informal Micro-, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (MSMEs) make up over 90% of all firms and account on average for 60-70% of total employment and 50% of GDP.

    The General Assembly, recognizing the importance of these enterprises, decided to declare 27 June the Micro-, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Day to raise public awareness of their contribution to sustainable development.

    Micro-, small and medium enterprises, the first responders to societal needs

    These types of enterprises are responsible for significant employment and income generation opportunities across the world and have been identified as a major driver of poverty alleviation and development.

    MSMEs tend to employ a larger share of the vulnerable sectors of the workforce, such as women, youth, and people from poorer households. MSMEs can even sometimes be the only source of employment in rural areas. As such, MSMEs as a group are the main income provider for the income distribution at the “base of the pyramid”.

    MSMEs should be the first responders to societal needs and provide the safety net for inclusiveness.

    Access to finance

    Although MSMEs generate the most new jobs, they face many challenges in day-to-day operations and to grow. Access to finance is often cited as one of the primary obstacles that affect MSMEs disproportionately. According to the World Bank, there are 200 to 245 million formal and informal enterprises that do not have a loan or overdraft, but are in need of one, or do have a loan but still find access to finance as a constraint. More than 90 percent are MSMEs.

    Financing constraints are also magnified for informal firms, which tend to be small in size, and although often less productive than formal enterprises, contribute significantly to economic activity and employment. Informal firms are estimated to account for around 74 percent of all MSMEs in the world, and around 77 percent of all MSMEs in developing countries. Unregistered firms rely mostly on informal financing, which — although important in facilitating access to finance — is associated with lower firm growth and increased firm illegality.

    A developed financial sector helps mobilize and allocate resources, and manage risks, contributing to private sector development. Finance helps economic growth, and in turn, job creation.

    With this challenge, an opportunity arises for both policy makers and the private sector to intervene at various levels to try to encourage the formalization, participation and growth of micro-, small and medium-sized enterprises in international, regional and national markets, including through access for all to capacity-building and financial services, such as affordable microfinance and credit.

    How they contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals

    Micro-, small and medium sized enterprises are vital in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, in particular in promoting innovation, creativity and decent work for all.

    Efforts to enhance access to finance for SMEs across key sectors of national economies are an important element of implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). SDG targets 8.3 and 9.3 call for enhancing the access of SMEs to financial services. In addition, SMEs are an important element in the implementation of SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth) and SDG 9 (industry, innovation and infrastructure).

    Celebration of the Day

    The General Assembly invites all Member States, organizations of the United Nations system and other international and regional organizations, as well as civil society, including non-governmental organizations, academia, individuals and other relevant stakeholders, to observe the Day in an appropriate manner and in accordance with national priorities, in order to raise public awareness of their contribution to sustainable development;

    It also invites Member States to facilitate the observance of the Day by fostering research presentations, policy discussions, practitioner workshops and business owner testimonials from around the world.

     

June 29, 2020
  • International Day of the Tropics 29 June

    June 29, 2020

    The Tropics are a region of the Earth, roughly defined as the area between the tropic of Cancer and the tropic of Capricorn. Although topography and other factors contribute to climatic variation, tropical locations are typically warm and experience little seasonal change in day-to-day temperature. An important feature of the Tropics is the prevalence of rain in the moist inner regions near the equator, and that the seasonality of rainfall increases with the distance from the equator.

    The Tropics account for 40 per cent of the world’s total surface area and are host to approximately 80 per cent of the world’s biodiversity and much of its language and cultural diversity. The tropical region faces a number of challenges such as climate change, deforestation, logging, urbanisation and demographic changes.

    Facts about the Tropics

    The Ecosystem

    The Tropics host nearly 95% of the world’s mangrove forests by area and 99% of mangrove species. The area of mangrove forest has decreased in all tropical regions since 1980. The Tropics have just over half of the world’s renewable water resources (54%), yet almost half their population is considered vulnerable to water stress. Biodiversity is greater in the Tropics across most taxonomic groups, with an equivalently higher proportion of threatened species. For those plants and animals for which there are adequate data, loss of biodiversity is greater in the Tropics than in the rest of the world. The Human system

    Consistent with the higher levels of poverty, more people experience undernourishment in the Tropics than in the rest of the Wworld. The proportion of the urban population living in slum conditions is higher in the Tropics than in the rest of the World. By 2050, the region will host most of the world's people and two-thirds of its children. The International Day of the Tropics celebrates the extraordinary diversity of the tropics while highlighting unique challenges and opportunities nations of the Tropics face. It provides an opportunity to take stock of progress across the tropics, to share tropical stories and expertise and to acknowledge the diversity and potential of the region.

    Follow on Twitter at: #WeAreTheTropics and #TropicsDay.

     

May 2020

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  • World Tuna Day (May 2)
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  • World Press Freedom Day (May 3)
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  • Time of Remembrance and Reconciliation for Those Who Lost Their Lives during the Second World War, (8-9 May )
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  • World Migratory Bird Day (May 10)
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  • International Day of Families 15 May
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  • International Day of Living Together in Peace 16 May
  • International Day of Light
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  • Logo World Telecommunication and Information Society Day 17 May
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